Lymphedema

The term “Lymphedema” is composed of two words: “lymph” and “edema”. "Edema” stands for the diffuse accumulation of any type of fluid in the soft tissue, more specifically: in between cells of this tissue. In case of localized accumulation of fluid, it is usually named according to the type of fluid “seroma”, “hematoma” or “biloma” for serous fluid, blood or bile correspondingly. The word “lymph” indicates the type of fluid which composes the above edema. Lymphedema usually develops as a consequence of the disruption of the lymph nodes draining this particular area of the body. The most common cause of lymphedema in the world is damage of the nodes by filaria, a parasite endemic to subtropical areas of Africa, Asia, Central and South America. In the developed countries, however, the most common cause of lymphedema includes surgical resection of affected lymph nodes during diagnostic or therapeutic excisional biopsy in the patients with malignant lesions. Rarely lymphedema can be caused by congenital dysfunction of specific lymphatic group. In an overwhelming majority of cases, it affects only one extremity and is usually observed early in life. Lymphedema overall is being over-diagnosed: non-lymphatic edema is being incorrectly diagnosed as lymphedema.

New York Vein Treatment Center can help diagnose this and other circulation related conditions. We helped thousands of patients in the New York area. Contact us to schedule your consultation.

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